Edward Charles Thomas

Edward Charles Thomas

Male 1815 - 1875  (59 years)

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  • Name Edward Charles Thomas 
    • Edward C. Thomas may be "Edward Charles Thomas" because the first born child (1869) of John Miller Thomas was named "Charles Edward Thomas."
    Nickname Edwin, Edmond, [Charles ?] 
    Born 15 Sep 1815  Nicholas County, Kentucky, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Probably Nicholas County, KY if Edward C. Thomas were the son of Edward Thomas and Elizabeth Shaw.
    Gender Male 
    Died 2 Jan 1875  Perry, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • No documented information relating to the exact place of death of Edward Charles Thomas (1815-1875) has been found. His estate was listed as a petitioner to partition property in 1879, probably upon his wife's death. Catherine Moore's obituary (d. 15 Aug 1879) states, "widow of Edward C. Thomas," but does not indicate where Edward died.
    Buried Round Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Find-A-Grave has some transcription errors.
    Notes 
    • In the U.S. Census Marion County, IN 1820, there are no households headed by a person with the surname "Thomas."

      In the U.S. Census Marion County, IN 1830, there are four households in three townships headed by a person with the surname "Thomas":

      "Perry Township-Richard Thomas [of Ohio, deed 11 May 1829]
      LawrenceTownship-Samuel Thomas
      Wayne Township-Elizabeth Thomas, William Thomas."

      In the U.S. Census Marion County, IN 1840, there are seven households in four townships headed by a person with the surname "Thomas:"

      "Perry Township-Edward Thomas, Joseph Thomas, Thomas N. Thomas
      Washington Township-Elizabeth [Shaw] Thomas
      Warren Township-Isaac Thomas
      Lawrence Township-John Thomas, William [S.] Thomas"

      In the U.S. Census Marion County, IN 1850, there are five households in four townships headed by a person with the surname "Thomas" AND BORN IN KENTUCKY.

      Lawrence Township: "William [S.] Thomas, age 45 b. Abt. 1805," [thus very likely the same "William" enumerated in 1840, as well as 1860, 1870 in this township, son of Edward Thomas & Elizabeth Shaw, hence brother of Thomas N. Thomas; husband of Mary Hensley].

      Perry Township: "Thomas N. Thomas, age 38 b. Abt. 1812," [very likely the same "Thomas N." enumerated in 1840, as well as 1860, 1870 in this township, son of Edward Thomas & Elizabeth Shaw, hence brother of William S. Thomas; husband of Eliza Mcfarland].

      Perry Township: "Edward Thomas, age 35 b. Abt. 1815," [very likely the same "Edward" enumerated in 1840, as well as 1860, 1870 in this township, husband of Catherine Moore].

      Indianapolis: "Caleb [Louis] Thomas, age 29 b. Abt. 1821; John [Mitchelltree] Thomas age 21 b. Abt. 1829;" [sons of John Thomas & Elizabeth Goff].

    • Hoosier State Chronicles, "Indiana State Sentinel," Indianapolis, Marion County::

      (v. 5, no.33) 5 Feb 1846, p. 3, "List of Letters Held at the Post Office, Indianapolis, IN: Thomas, Edward" (postage due)

      (v. 9, no 20), 25 Oct 1849, p. 7, "A List of Land and Lots--Tax Delinquencies":

      "Thomas, Edward. south end, southeast quarter, Section 35, Township 15, Range 3, 77.50 Acres, Value-- Land $620 Improvements $300 Total $920 Personal Property $150 = Total Taxable $1070. Delinquent Tax Penalty & Interest $8.21 + Current year taxes (1848) $6.88 - Total Due $15.09."

    • A description of agriculture around Indianapolis, IN in 1843, when Edward C. Thomas was farming in Perry Township, Marion County, IN:

      (From 1839 until 1847, Henry Ward Beecher was the minister of the Second Presbyterian Church in Indianapolis. There, Beecher avidly pursued his interest in gardening. He regularly contributed a column about horticulture to the "The Indiana Journal." In 1847, Reverend Beecher became the first minister of Brooklyn, NY's just organized Plymouth Congregational Church. At the time of his death in 1887, Reverend Beecher was preaching to as many as 2,000 or more each Sunday and was the most famous clergyman in America.)

      http://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/imh/article/view/5622/4966

      "Indiana Magazine of History," Volume III, Issue 4 (1907), pp 189-193:

      "INDIANAPOLIS IN 1843: A HENRY WARD BEECHER LETTER.

      We are indebted to Mr. W. H. Ragan, of Washington, D. C, for a copy of this interesting letter, which was originally published in Hovey's 'Magazine of Horticulture,' of Boston, Massachusetts. It contains information not to be found elsewhere, both as to horticulture in Indiana and conditions in Indianapolis at an early day. We have omitted an unimportant preliminary paragraph.

      'In this State we have an area a little more than four times greater than Massachusetts. There are eighteen nurseries, whose proprietors are chiefly supported by their sales. Apple trees sell for ten, and pear for twenty cents. An orchard is to be found upon almost every farm, and lately the pear has been more than ever sought after. At our October [Marion county fair] was exhibited the greatest variety of fruits and flowers ever exhibited in this State, perhaps I may say in the West. From fifty-five to sixty varieties of apples were shown, and forty-three new seedling apples competed for a [prize]. A branch of the Rhode Island Greening was exhibited, two feet in length, bearing fifteen apples, weighing 12 lbs. 9 oz. I send you a brief account of the fair, enclosed in some other papers. You will see a beet mentioned, weighing thirty-two lbs. You will also see three seedling apples named and recommended for cultivation: Tariff, Red Jacket, and Osceola; the first two, capital fall apples, the last supposed to be a first-rate late winter apple. Those which we have are not yet ripe [January 24, 1843], nor at all fit for eating. The number of seedling apples in this State is very great, and some of them, in the neighborhood in which they grow, are esteemed more highly by the settlers than the old standard fruits. The soil and climate so modify the flavor and other qualities of the apple that there is some reason for believing that an apple originated on any given soil, will be better than many which are introduced into it; for though the apple is raised with great facility in almost every soil, yet it is probable that each variety affects a particular one and will refuse its most perfect qualities to all except that one. Thus, I perceive, the most popular apples of New England are natives: the Rhode Island Greening, Hubbardston Nonsuch, Roxbury Russett, Baldwin, Minster, etc. The choice apples of the middle States are natives of them, and to a very considerable extent this is becoming true of the West.

      The annual meeting of our [Church] is held during the winter, [so] the greater number of citizens from [rural areas], during the sessions of our courts and legislatures, may be reached and interested in this [event]. I shall send you the reports, address and proceedings of our winter meeting as soon as they are published.

      I omitted to mention that on selling the fruit last October, great competition arose for the pears, and they sold at 12, 25 and 50 cents apiece, many of them. I obtained the only specimen of the Duchesse d'Angouleme (the first I believe which has ripened in the State) for the moderate price of 62 cents. I am afraid I should have doubled the bid rather than have lost her ladyship; and if all duchesses are of equal worth commend me to their society. I need not say I was 'somewhat filled' with her company. It was not a dear bargain in the sequel, for the gentleman who raised it was so much pleased with my enthusiasm for his favorite that he presented me a tree of the same kind, and one of the Beurre d'Aremberg.

      You will perceive, when you obtain the report of our winter meeting, that a [prize] of fifty dollars is offered for seedling apples, other premiums to encourage gardens, the obtaining of choice fruit trees, introduction of hardy shrubs and flowers, etc. Our great design is to awaken in the body of the peopleamong farmers, artizans and men of small means a taste for fruit and flowers, and to fill the State, from the beginning, with the most select varieties. The peach, plum, cherry, apple, pear, quince, apricot, and small fruits might search through our land and find no better soil and climate for their perfection than that of Indiana. Our variable springs are almost the only obstacle. Long summers, brilliantly clear atmosphere, great warmth, and dryness during the fall ripening months, give our fruit great size, color, and flavor. If the mass of the community take hold earnestly, amateur cultivators will spring up of themselves. As it is I remember very few gardens in Massachusetts, except near large cities, which could compare with ten or twenty in this town (Indianapolis is a town of about the size of Northampton).

      In going to Terre Haute, Indiana last summer I stopped at a small, poverty-stricken little town called Mt. Meridian; shackly houses, huts and hovels, pale faces and ragged children gave no great expectation of refinements. Putting up at the best tavern (in the West, no matter how small the town, there are always from two to five or even eight taverns to choose among), I soon retired to bed as the easiest way of reaching next morning. On rising and going into the rear of the building for washing water (we are always allowed to help ourselves in such trifles), I found the well standing in the middle of a very beautiful little flower garden; neat beds full of flowers, cleaned walks, trimmed borders. I could hardly trust my eyes. From the rear of the grounds I could almost throw a stone into the primeval forests, whose fragments yet lingered in parts of the garden; and the house was itself poorer than many a barn which I have seen in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts. Opening a rude wicket gate, I entered a spot of nearly an acre, well laid out and filled with the choicest vegetables, growing with the most vigorous health. Currants, raspberries (white and red Antwerp), strawberries, gooseberries, were thriving, and many select varieties of pear and apple. The whole garden bore evidence of careful cultivation and good taste. Such a spot, in such a town, and behind such a house, surrounded and almost overshadowed by the forest, and produced, not by wealth, but by the personal labor of one man, poor and advanced in life, delighted me more, I do believe, than would the grounds of the London Horticultural Society. If every county in our State had one such citizen I should not fear for horticultural interests in our State. The best assortment of seeds and plants which our town will afford shall be at the service of such a cultivator the coming spring.

      You will be pleased to learn that many of the pears which have given out in New England do well as yet with us. The St. Michael (or fall butter, as it is called here), thrives and bears excellently well, though Kenrick, following Fessenden, says that in New England it is 'an outcast, intolerable even to the sight.' The specimens at our fall fair could hardly be surpassed.

      A number of public-spirited gentlemen have associated, to plant all the private streets in this town with shade trees. We shall select from the ample stock of our own forests, mostly. But it is proposed to put in a number of pear and plum trees; the first being a beautiful shaped tree as well as fruitful, and the plum, it is thought, will be free from the curculio, planted upon a highway. In the three squares upon which stand the State House, Court House, and Governor's House, it is proposed to gather and plant a specimen of all our forest trees.

      This reminds me of an incident in our early town history related to me by one of the first settlers. A large circle of nearly four acres was reserved in the center of the town and the native trees, sugar maples, left standing upon it. Under these trees, before churches were built, religious meetings were held in summer, and the prospect was that our town would have an adornment of this little grove which no architecture can bestow. One morning, however, he was attracted thither by the sound of an axe, and found one of the leading lawyers of the place exercising himself, as a preparation for breakfast, in felling one of the largest trees. It was too far cut to be saved. And so good an example could not be lost upon others. One by one these magnificent trees disappeared. Now we have a huge yellow brick building in the center of this circle; about a dozen locusts, with stems half as large as one's wrist, have for the three last years been struggling for life until they seem weary and faint, and so stand still.

      The Court House Square, something larger than the former piece of ground, was covered with a noble growth of stately trees, and it was determined to save them. A man was set, however, to thin out the plat, and being left to his own discretion, he felled all the younger trees and left the very old and tall ones standing. As might have been expected, the first wind, finding an easy passage through, uprooted a multitude of trees, and the citizens, to save the rest from a like fate, chopped them down instantly, and happily relieved this square, too, from unpleasant shade. All is not yet told. At a later day a number of gentlemen procured an order (if I mistake not) from the county commissioners to plant out the ground with shade trees, and a large number of the locust was set. However, that nothing might break in upon the practice of the county, the jailer's cow was permitted to pasture upon the plat, and in sight of the citizens she proceeded patiently to bark the trees or break them down, until not a single one was left. A gentleman not without a taste for horticulture, from day to day, saw, from his office door, this destruction, as he informed me with great naivete, as though it were a sin to interfere and save the trees. Thus, in all our towns, comes first, extermination; then come scorching summer suns, and too late the wish that the trees had been spared; and at last planting begins, and we who live amid the immense forests of a new country; on whose town plat, not fifteen years ago, grew immense oaks, maples, sycamores, beeches, tulip trees and elms?are planting the short lived locusts {Robinia pseudo-acacia) to obtain a speedy shade! I can think of but three forest trees now standing in this town within a space one mile square: two elms and one buckeye. The same scenes are enacting in every town which springs up at the West. We are gaining meadows, and corn bottoms, and green hillsides, and town plats, by an utter extermination of the forest. Here and there an Indian may be found lingering around the old possessions of his nation, as if to mourn their loss, and to remind us of his ancestors; but of the forest, it is almost true that not a single tree is left to recall to our minds the glory of its fellows. Indeed, I have thought that those who were obliged to clear farms or timber land, imbibe the same feelings toward trees which the pioneers have toward the Indians?as things to be destroyed, of course. This devastation of our forests the political economist regards as a blunder, and says it is an unthrifty practice, but one who looks upon trees almost as if they had souls, witnesses this needless extermination with some feelings which can not be expressed in the pound and penny language of the mere economist. I think it is Michaux who pronounces the full-grown elm to be the most magnificent production of the vegetable kingdom. Is not an old, and tall, and broad, and healthy tree nobler to the eye than any temple or cathedral? The wonder of a century's growth ends in an hour by some man who never for one single moment thinks of the majesty or beauty of his victim; who only thinks how soonest to get it down, and burned up, and out of the way of the plough.

      Respectfully yours, H. W. BEECHER.

      Indianapolis, Indiana, January, 1843.'"

    • Indiana State Digital Archives, Marion County Circuit Court:

      "15 Apr 1842, Edward Thomas, Defendant, State v. Hampton Kelly & Edward Thomas, Assault/Battery."

      "15 May 1843, Edward Thomas, Defendant, State v. Edward Thomas, Horse Racing."

      "1844, Edward Thomas, Defendant, State v. Edward Thomas, Criminal Case [no details provided]."

      "26 Oct 1846, John F. Ramsey v. Edward Thomas, Defendant, Civil Case."

      "6 Jun 1853, Edward Thomas, Juror, Serve on Grand Jury."

      "9 Jun 1856, Edward Thomas, Subject of State Subpoena; Second Party-Samuel Jackson."

      "1 Mar 1861, Edward Thomas, Plaintiff, v. John B. & Mary A. Vail, Civil Case."

      "2 May 1865, State v. Edward Thomas, Buyer, Nicholas Blaes, Seller, Selling Liquor-No License."

      "15 Oct 1866, Edward Thomas, Plaintiff, v. Robert Rae, Civil Case."

      "12 Aug 1868, Edward Thomas, et. al., Defendant, v. William Berryman."

      Indiana Digital Archives, Marion County Court of Common Pleas:

      "13 Mar 1867, Edward Thomas, Plaintiff, v. John Burns, George W. Black, B.W. Warfield, Doctor Van Buskirk."

      "2 Apr 1870, David R. Silvester v. Robert Thomas, Edward Thomas, & Mantier Robinson, Defendants."

    Person ID I12936  Complete
    Last Modified 3 Dec 2017 

    Father Edward Thomas,   b. England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Mar 1836, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother Elizabeth Shaw,   b. 15 Feb 1777, Kentucky County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 May 1866, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years) 
    Married 20 Aug 1795  Mercer County, Kentucky, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Mercer County, KY Marriages, 1786-1800 & Wills, 1786-1801; Kentucky Marriages, 1802-1850: "Edward Thomas & Eliz. Shaw, m. 20 Aug 1795, by John Mason."
    Family ID F5968  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Catherine Moore,   b. 21 Aug 1819, Fermanagh, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Aug 1879, Maywood, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 59 years) 
    Married 30 Aug 1838  Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Indiana State Library Genealogy Database, Marriages through 1850: "Edwin [sic] Thomas & Catherine Moore, m. 30 Aug 1838 Marion County."

      LDS FamilySearch, Indiana Marriages, 1780-1992: "Catherine Moore & Edmond [sic] Thomas, m. 30 Aug 1838 Marion County."

      [Catherine Moore's obituary states, "widow of Edward C. Thomas." Census records for 1840, 1850, 1860, 1870 uniformly show "Edward Thomas."]


    Notes 
    • Indiana Digital Archives, Marion County Superior Court:

      "17 Oct 1879, Edward Thomas, Petitioner & William T. Thames, et al, Petitioners, Civil Case-Partition of Property."
    Children 
     1. William S. Thomas,   b. Feb 1841, Perry, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft. 1920, PROBABLY Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 79 years)
     2. Nancy C. Thomas,   b. Abt. 1843, Perry, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Nov 1879  (Age ~ 36 years)
    +3. John Miller Thomas,   b. 5 Feb 1844, Perry, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Feb 1924, Marywood, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
    +4. Robert Thomas,   b. 26 Jan 1847, Perry, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Sep 1916, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years)
    +5. Mary E Thomas,   b. Abt. 1848, Perry, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location
    +6. Iva Jane Thomas,   b. Mar 1848, Perry, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt. 1921, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 72 years)
    +7. Isabelle Thomas,   b. 20 Nov 1850, Perry, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Oct 1878, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 27 years)
     8. Margaret Frances Thomas,   b. Abt. 1853, Perry, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Jan 1862, Perry, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 9 years)
    +9. Thomas Edward Thomas,   b. Mar 1854, Perry, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Oct 1924, PROBABLY, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 70 years)
    +10. Elias Nelson Thomas,   b. 18 Dec 1855, Perry, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft. 1916, Prob. Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years)
     11. George Washington Thomas,   b. Abt. 1858, Perry, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt. 1876  (Age ~ 18 years)
     12. Benjamin Thomas,   b. Abt. 1861, Perry, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified 29 Nov 2013 
    Family ID F5766  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 15 Sep 1815 - Nicholas County, Kentucky, U.S.A. Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 30 Aug 1838 - Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 2 Jan 1875 - Perry, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Round Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A. Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Edward C. Thomas (1815-  ) & Catherine Moore (1819-1879)
    Edward C. Thomas (1815- ) & Catherine Moore (1819-1879)

    Find-A-Grave: Round Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, U.S.A.

    This monument for the Thomas family was evidently erected after the death of Catherine by the more wealthy Moore family.

    The inscription for Edward's death, "January 1, 1870," is clearly a guess as is that for his age, for he was listed in the summer of 1870 as the head of the Thomas family by the U.S. Census enumerator.

    Also, the middle initial "C' on the monument has weathered in such a way that it appears to be the letter "G."

    Documents
    Edward C. Thomas (1815-1879), Farm mortgage, 1847
    Edward C. Thomas (1815-1879), Farm mortgage, 1847

    "Saline Fund," Indianapolis, IN "Indiana State Sentinel," 28 Apr 1847, p. 3

    Edward C. Thomas had a mortgage of $415.88 on seventy acres in Marion County. He had not paid the interest due to the "Saline Lands Fund" on the mortgage, so the State of Indiana advertised the seventy acres for sale at a public auction. It is not known if Edward C. Thomas paid the interest past due and thus retained ownership.

    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~acorntree/history/delaware-co/thomasbhelm/helm-school-funds-6.html

    "Chapter VI. SCHOOL FUNDS. . . . THE SALINE FUND.

    Another clause in the enabling act [state constitution], provides that all salt springs in the Territory and the land reserved for the use of the same, should be granted to the State for the use of the people of the State on such terms as the Legislature should prescribe. The Legislature subsequently enacted that the proceeds of these reservation, likewise, should become a part of the school fund of the State. These lands sold for the aggregate sum of about $85,000, which has, since that time, been at interest, yielding a respectable portion of our annual income."
    Edward Charles Thomas (1815-1879) IRS Tax Record, 1865
    Edward Charles Thomas (1815-1879) IRS Tax Record, 1865

    "Perry Township: Edward Thomas, Income Valuation $854, rate 5%, Tax $42.85; one carriage Tax $1.00; Total $43.85"

    The "Edward Thomas" of Perry Township, Marion County, Indiana, who owed the tax on an income of $854 and a carriage, evidently was the husband of Catherine Moore, but the tax form contained no other identifying information and no middle initial.

    Ancestry.com
    Robert Thomas (1847-1916), Death certificate
    Robert Thomas (1847-1916), Death certificate

    This death certificate is important because it provides the names and nativity of the parents of Robert Thomas.

    The occupation of Robert Thomas was "contractor."
    Catherine Moore (1819-1879), Obituary
    Catherine Moore (1819-1879), Obituary

    Indianapolis, IN "News," 16 Aug 1879, p. one

    "DIED. THOMAS--Catherine, widow of Edward C. Thomas, aged sixty-one years eight months, August 15th at her residence near Maywood, Marion County. Funeral to take place Sunday, 17 Aug 1879 at the Methodist Episcopal Church in Maywood. Friends of the deceased are invited to attend."
    Edward Charles Thomas (1815-1875) Death notice
    Edward Charles Thomas (1815-1875) Death notice

    Indianapoiis, IN, "The Evening News," Tuesday, 5 Jan 1875, p. 3:

    "City News: Edward Thomas, an old settler of Perry Township, died Saturday [2 Jan 1875]."

    Census Records
    Edward Charles Thomas(1815- ) U.S.Census Perry, Marion County, IN 1840
    Edward Charles Thomas(1815- ) U.S.Census Perry, Marion County, IN 1840

    "Edward Thomas, one male under age 5 [William S.], one male age 20-29 [Edward], and one female age 20-29 [Catherine Moore]."

    Since his first child, William S. Thomas, was listed in the U.S. Census of 1850 as being "age 10 b. Indiana," it appears that he was a baby when the family was enumerated for the Census of 1840.

    Furthermore, no "Edward Thomas" is listed, in "U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907" among those who purchased land in Marion County, IN from the federal government.

    Since Edward Thomas in 1850 owned a farm in Perry, Marion, IN, he must have acquired the land from a private party, rather than from the federal government.
    U.S. Census Perry, Marion County, IN 1850 Edward Charles Thomas (1815- )
    U.S. Census Perry, Marion County, IN 1850 Edward Charles Thomas (1815- )

    "Edward Thomas age 35 b. Abt 1815 KY, farmer, real estate owned $2,000; wife Catherine age 34 b. Ireland; six children b. Indiana: William 10, Nancy C. 7, John 6, Ira 5, Robert 4, Mary E. 2."
    U.S. Census Perry, Marion, IN 1860: Edward Charles Thomas (1815- )
    U.S. Census Perry, Marion, IN 1860: Edward Charles Thomas (1815- )

    "Edward Thomas, age 45 b. Abt. 1815 Kentucky, farmer, real estate owned $7540, personal property $565; wife Catherine age 42 b. Abt. 1817 Ireland; children b. Indiana: William S. 21, Nancy C. 18, John 16, Ira J. 14, Robert 12, Mary E. 10, Isabell 8, Margaret F. 6, Edward T. 5, Elias N. 3, George W. 1."
    Edward Charles Thomas (1815- ) U.S. Census  Perry, Marion, IN 1870
    Edward Charles Thomas (1815- ) U.S. Census Perry, Marion, IN 1870

    "Edward Thomas, age 55 b. Abt. 1815 Kentucky, father of foreign birth & mother born USA [sic], farmer real estate owned $18,000, personal property $800, wife Catherine, age 53 b. Abt. 1817 Ireland, father & mother of foreign birth; nine children b. Indiana: William S. 30, farmhand personal property $500, Nancy E. 26, Ira 24 farmhand, Robert 22 farmhand, Mary E. 21, Isabell 19, Thomas 15 farmhand, Nelson 13, George 12, Benjamine 9."

    John M. Thomas had left the household; Nancy's middle initial was shown as "E" rather than as "C" as indicated on the Census of 1860.