Notes


Tree:  

Matches 101 to 125 of 8,626

      «Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 346» Next»

 #   Notes   Linked to 
101
http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/t/a/y/Jason-L-Taylor/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0226.html

"Notes for Johan Adam DIEHL: 1739 Ship 'Samuel,' Captain: Hugh Percy; From: Rotterdam, Arrival: Philadelphia, 27 Aug 1739. A list of 111 male passengers over 16 years of age: . . . Nichl Simon, 63 . . . Adam Diehl, 52, Maria Catharina (Kreischer), Carl, 22." 
Diehl, Johan Adam (I40590)
 
102
http://files.usgwarchives.net/ky/bullitt/deeds/h620004.txt

"10 March 1803 Bullitt Co. Deed Book A2 p.313 Nathaniel HARRIS of Bullitt County Kentucky of the one part to Jesse
JAMES of the County and state aforesaid of the other part ... that for and in consideration of the full and just sum of eighty five pounds current money to them in hand paid have given granted bargained and sold a certain tract or parcel of land containing one hundred acres of land being part of TILFORD's settlement and preemption Situate lying
and being in the County of Bullitt on the waters of Cedar Creek South side of Salt river and bounded by said HARRISES
line... to RIDGEWAY'S corner... to a Cedar standing in the line of TILFORD's Settlement.

(signed) Natl. HARRIS Susanna HARRIS
Recorded 5 June 1803 Bullitt Co. KY Court" 
Family F18043396
 
103
http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~shawhan/volumeone/271-316.pdf

"Seth was a blacksmith and prominent businessman in Hartford City, serving on the city council and the hospital board. Georgia was very close to her nephew Douglas, who remembers her comment in the 1970s that she felt that her generation was the luckiest of all generations because they had seen mankind move literally from the horse and buggy days all the way to sending people to the moon." 
Diehl, Seth D. (I41142)
 
104
http://listsearches.rootsweb.com/th/read/HARRIS-COLONIALVA/2005-04/1113003220

"1806 deed from William & Mary Panabaker to Nathaniel Harris all of Bullitt Co. KY. $350 for 290 acres on Buffaloe Run bounded by Henry Tillens preemption, written & recorded 2 Apr 1806 (Bullitt Co. Deed Bk B p. 51).

1808 tax list of Bullitt Co. KY with 3 white males over 21. 4 blacks over 16 / 5 blacks total. 324 acres on whatever creek Sarah Harris lived on [can't make it out] first entered by J. Tilford. 290 acres on Buffaloe Run, Bullitt Co., first entered in the name of Isaac Baker. 275 acres on Crooked Creek, Bullitt Co., first entered in the name of Matthew Walton.

1808 deed from Nathaniel & Susannah Harris to John Harris, all of Bullitt Co. KY. 120 pounds for 290 acres - land on Buffaloe Run bordered Henry Tillins line & Jacob Myers tract, written 12 Jun 1808 (Bullitt Co. Deed Bk B p. 225).

1810 U.S Census Bullitt Co. KY. Harris, Nathaniel

1817 tax list of Nelson Co. KY, 1 white male over 21. No land. (next to Micajah Harris)" 
Family F18043396
 
105
http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=woodrow_wilson&id=I0038

OBITUARY: New York Times, February 15, 1936:

"MRS. FRANK COMPTON, WILSON'S NIECE, DIES: Wife of Chicago Publisher Is Stricken Aboard Ship En Route to Tahiti.

CHICAGO, Feb. 14. - Mrs. Annie Howe Compton, wife of Frank E. Compton, Chicago publisher, and a niece of President Wilson, died aboard the motorship Stella Polaris yesterday en route to Tahiti, with her husband, it was learned by radiogram here today. She will be buried at sea at midnight tonight.

Mrs. Compton was the daughter of Mrs. George Howe, President Wilson's sister, and for a time his official hostess at the White House. She met Mr. Compton, head of the Compton's Pictured Encyclopedia Company, while he was visiting the Summer home of President Wilson in Cornish, NH. Both were frequent guests at the White House. Mrs. Compton is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Hoyt Hilton of New York, and a brother, George Howe, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at North Carolina University."
 
Family F18043305
 
106
http://whmc.umsystem.edu/exhibits/ramsay/ramsay_mississippi.html

"Place name: Deal Cottonwood Tree [Charleston, Mississippi County, MO]

Description: A famous landmark near the E.P. Deal residential place on State Street in Charleston. It served as a watchtower during the Civil War when Colonel H.J. Deal gave warning of the approach of the Confederate forces. (Charleston Democrat 1937, Ida Deal)

Source: Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938."
 
Diehl, Henry Jacob (I40558)
 
107
http://www.archive.org/details/historyofmcleanc00lebarich

The History of McLean County, Illinois: containing a history of the county, its cities, towns, &c., portraits of early settlers and prominent men, general statistics, map of McLean County, history of Illinois, illustrated, history of the Northwest, illustrated, constitution of the United States, miscellaneous matters, &c., (Chicago: W. LeBaron Jr. & Co., 1879), p. 970:

"JAMES E. KILLION, farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 14; P. 0. Downs; b. 3 Mar 1828 in Clay County, Indiana.

His grandfather, Adam Killion, was a Revolutionary patriot, and served in the American army during the Revolutionary struggle, until he was captured by the British, from whom he, with two others made their escape. He died in Indiana, about the year 1821.

The father of James E. Killion was Matthias J. Killion, who was b. 26 Apr 1804; he m. 18 Mar 1824 Nancy A. Barnett; she was b. 21 Jan 1805 in Indiana and d. 13 Nov 1843, leaving nine children, of whom six are now living.

Mr. K. [Matthias J. Killion] married a second time, and has by his second wife twelve children, making twenty-one in all; he now lives near his son James E. [Killian], at the advanced age of 75 years, and in possession of all his faculties." 
Killion, Mathias John Jefferson (I0489)
 
108
http://www.lowdermilk.org/images/Jacob.PDF

"Notes for STEPHEN A. LOWDERMILK:

Stephen died in Clay County, IN near Ashboro; the town that he and son William named. Stephen brought his family to the Midwest because he had a falling out with his father over slavery. He thought [the slaves] should be freed. So with his entire family, his brothers Elliott and Jacob he started west. Stopping in Indiana, his brother Jacob ended up in Missouri and Elliott found his way to Arkansas. William was age 15 when they started to Ind. They also, named Mt. Olive Church after their home church in North Carolina.

Stephen A. Lowdermilk first settled on the Eel River, but shortly afterwards moved to Jackson township, Section 29 and built a cabin. Stephen later went on foot to Vincennes, IN to enter his first 40 acres of land from the Government,
adding more later, making a total of 150 acres.

It was at this time he met and married his second wife, Mrs. Sarah Bolin (ca 1838). He was an active Methodist, his cabin
having been used for the first Church services. For 23 years, he was Justice of the Peace, without having a single judgement reversed. He was importantly connected with the organization of the county and township. His eldest son by
Sarah, Calvin, was reared on this farm. Stephen was a life-long supporter of Republican principles. He was a very prominent man in public affairs. As Justice of Peace serving satisfactory for thirty years, during which time his decisions were never appealed or questioned.

The Capal Place deeds 1787-1908 9 items. From the Southern
Historical Collection. The deeds to the Capal place tract are as follows:

1787: THOMAS WILLIAMS to JOHN WILLIAMS 100 acres on Little River
1800: Land grant to THOMAS WINSLOW, 500 acres on Little River
1814: WILLIAM PRESNELL to SAMUEL GRAVES, 60 acres (Samuel is father of Mary Ann) on Little River
1816: SAMUEL GRAVES to WILLIAM LOWDERMILK 60 acres (William, son of John H. Graves, Sr.) on Little River
1819: STEPHEN LOWDERMILK to WILLIAM LOWDERMILK (brothers) 50 acres on Little River
1826: JOHN WILLIAMS to JOHN LOWDERMILK, 2 acres on Pole Branch
1836: WILLIAM LOWDERMILK to ELIZAH WILLIAMS, 72 acres on Pole Branch of Little River
1909: WILLIAM WILLIAMS and MARGARET WILLIAMS to THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, 86 acres on Pole Branch
Undated: Description of a tract of land in Union Township
just north of the Auman's Crossroads." 
Lowdermilk, Stephen A. (I19596)
 
109
http://www.merceronline.com/mercer.htm#You

"Harrodsburg, the county seat of Mercer County, was founded in 1774 by a stalwart band of pioneers led by James Harrod, of Pennsylvania. It was the only "colonial" city and the first permanent English settlement west of the Allegheny mountains. . . .

Harrodsburg was first the county seat of Fincastle County, Virginia, then Kentucky County Virginia. When Kentucky County was divided into the counties of Fayette, Jefferson and Lincoln, Harrodsburg was the county seat of Lincoln County, which at that time covered over a third of the soon to be state.

In 1785 Mercer County was taken from Lincoln and Harrodsburg has remained the county seat of Mercer County. The Kentucky territory became a state in 1792."


http://www.merceronline.com/history.htm

"The year 1785 was an eventful one in the history of Harrodsburg for it was considered to petition the Legislature for an Act establishing the town. This petition was duly prepared and was in the following terms: . . .

For which your petitioners are bound in duty to pray, . . .

Henry Thomas . . . James Thomas . . "

[Henry and James Thomas seem not to be related to children, including John, of Morris Thomas and Elizabeth Poague.]
 
Thomas, John (slaveowner) (I41601)
 
110
http://www.ncgenweb-data.com/catawba/herman/b40253.htm#P40254

"1. Johannes Wilhelm (William) HERMAN1,2 was born about 1736 in Germany.3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11 He signed a will on 22 January 1813 in Lincoln County, North Carolina. He died on 29 June 1813 at the age of 77 in Lincoln (Catawba County), North Carolina.5,8,10,11 Johannes was buried in Old St. Paul's Church Cemetery, Newton, Catawba County, NC.11 Inscription reads: Aged 77 years John William Herman, whose German name was Johannes Wilhelm Herrmann, was born in 1736 in Germany. He married Catherine Motz (Motes) and to them was born a son, George. In mid-year 1766 William and his family boarded the ship Polly, Robert Porter, Master of ship, at Rotterdam to sail to the new land of America. Upon arriving in the American port of Philadelphia, William signed his name as Johann Wm. Herman and swore the Oath of Allegiance on 18 October 1766. It was written that William was "from Rotterdam, but last from Cowles. Later, William and his family settled in Berks County, near Reading, Pennsylvania. Here William owned land in Long Swamp, Ruscombe Manor and Heresford Townships (Series II Pa. Archives Vol. XVlII). The last tax listing for William Herman was in 1785, in which were listed 100 acres of land, three horses, two cows, and eight family members.

Miss Estelle Herman, a great, great granddaughter of William, pioneer, remembered hearing about two Herman brothers who came from Pennsylvania to North Carolina on horseback to look the country over. On their trip, when they camped for the night, they tied their horses so they could graze while they slept. North Carolina appealed to them so much that they decided to move their families here. Some Herman notes written by Polly Killian in 1876 said: "Came to North Carolina in 1779. Moved to North Carolina in 1786. Settled on Lyles creek and entered land which has been handed down from father to son till the present time. George Herman, second son of Wilhelm, came to North Carolina in 1781."

Wilhelm Herman died 29 June 1813 at the age of 77 years and was buried in the cemetery of St. Paul's Lutheran Church near Newton. His wife, Catherine, died in March 1811 at the age of 77 years and is also buried in the same cemetery.. Wilhelm (William) and Catharine Herman and their children, William Jr., George, Peter, Michael, Catharine, and Mary became active and useful citizens of their chosen communities. They were members of, and often officers in the German Reformed churches of St. Paul's and St, John's near Newton and Conover respectively.

. . .

Johannes Wilhelm (William) HERMAN and Maria Catherine MOTZ were married in 1760 in Germany.3,4,7Maria Catherine MOTZ2 was born in 1734 in Hesse Cassel, Germany.5,8,9,10,12,13She died on 14 March 1811 at the age of 77 in Lincoln (Catawba County), North Carolina.13 She was buried in Old St. Paul's Church Cemetery, Newton, Catawba County, NC.14 Inscription reads: Aged 77 years" 
Herrmann/Herman, Johannes Wilhelm/William (I13336)
 
111
http://www.treasurer.mo.gov/history/EdwinPDeal.aspx

"Edwin P. Deal, 23rd State Treasurer: 1913-1917. . . . He was county treasurer and county collector, and was appointed a member of the Swamp Land Commission by Governor William Joel Stone in 1895, serving as secretary of that commission. Mr. Deal represented Mississippi County in the 44th through 46th General Assemblies, and was chairman of the House Appropriation Committee in the 46th General Assembly. He received the Democratic nomination for state treasurer on Aug. 6, 1912, and was elected to the office in November. The salaries of the state treasurer and employees remained the same as his predecessor, however he added another bookkeeper, making a total of seven employees.

He married Mary Crenshaw on Sept. 3, 1879. They had two children. Mr. Deal died at Charleston on 10 Dec 1945." 
Deal, Edwin Peter (I40606)
 
112
Indianapolis Star, May 10, 1932

"Death Notices: CRAYTON- William D., passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Goldie Stringer 1539 S. Belmont ave., beloved husband of Maggie Crayton and father of Mrs. Daisy Kern and Mrs. Goldie Stringer. Funeral Tuesday at 2 p.m. at the residence . Burial Floral Park Cemetery, Friends invited. Comanche Tribe of Red Men take notice."
 
Crayton, William Donovan (I39045)
 
113
It does not appear that any member of the William Davenport, b. 1800 North Carolina, family was related to Benjamin F. Davenport, b. Abt. 1815 England, since none of the children of Benjamin and Margaret (Abel) Davenport were placed, upon Margaret's death, with members of William Davenport's extended family. This fact also seems to confirm that Benjamin F. Davenport's sole relatives in Indiana were members of his wife's family, the Abel clan.

Roy Richard Thomas April 2012

U.S. Census Hensley, Johnson County, IN 1850: "William Devenport, age 50 b. Abt. 1800 Kentucky [sic], farmer real estate owned $800, wife Delila, age 49 b. abt. 1801 Kentucky; eight children b. Indiana: Austin 21, Mary J. 17, Jesse 16, Hannah 12, Susannah 11, James 9, Eliza A. 7, Delila C. 5."

U.S. Census Hensley, Johnson County, IN 1860: "William Davenport, age 60 b. Abt. 1800 North Carolina [sic], farmer real estate owned $2000 other property $800, wife Lucy J., age 29 b. abt. 1831 Kentucky; three children from previous marriage b. Indiana: James H. 19, Eliza 17, Delila C. 15." Also in the household: "Jemima Kephart, 4." 
Davenport, William (I39474)
 
114
James Sims and the mining engineer James Sims i31633 of Redruth (1795-1875) were second cousins. 
Sims, James (I1518)
 
115
Kentucky Pioneer & Court Records, Mercer County, Harrodsburg Court House: "Benjamin Graham . . . Exec's, brother Samuel Graham and friend, Elisha Thomas. . . . Proved September 1890 Court." 
Thomas, Elisha (I41606)
 
116
LDS FamilySearch, submission by Dorothy B. Wear, 20 Dec 2007:

"According to all records I could locate on Hettie Davenport, she was born after the death of Reuben M. Harlan, and before the marriage of Cynthia to Abel Davenport. She is listed as Hettie Davenport, therefore she must have been adopted by Mr. Davenport. In the Civil War file for Abel Davenport, he stated he had no children and was not married prior to Cynthia Harlan and his marriage. This gives credence that Hettie is not the child of David Abel Davenport. Hettie married J. S. Harlan, son of William R. Harlan and Sarah Norman. . . . J. S. and Hettie had a son Joe Harlan, who married an Agnes (?). I met this couple when I was very little when they came to Los Angeles,California to visit Joe's half-cousin and my grandfather, Reuben Lee Harlan. My grandparents and my father, Lee Harlan told me they were cousins. It took me several years to connect the "cousin" relationship. The book, 'History and Genealogy of the Harlan Family,' written in 1914 by Alpheus H. Harlan, on page 612, number, 2729, lists the genealogy for Reuben M. Harlan and shows only the first wife and his children. However, Hettie Davenport is listed as the wife of J. E. Harlan. No further information was given by Alpheus Harlan on this family. By doing the censuses for the Reuben M. and Cynthia (Darnell) Harlan family, I have compiled the names of their children, and again, Hettie is not listed until the 1870 census for Louisville, KY." 
Davenport, Hettie Belle (I40307)
 
117
Mary Ellen (Galer) Fountain had a second marriage to, E. C. Wilson who was born Dec. 12, 1847.
They lived in Goshen, Indiana, where E. C. Wilson was a well known owner of a music store. After the famous Chicago fire started by Mrs. O' Leary's cow, E. C. Wilson put together a wagon train filled with pianos which he led into Chicago, where he sold them to replace the numerous pianos burned up in the fire. He was also known for the fact that he purchased the first complete set of brass band instruments manufactured by the Conn musicao instrument company of Elkhart. Indiana. Mary Ellen's daughter, Winifred Fountain, took on the name of Winifred Wilson. She always spoke with love and respect of her stepfather.  
Galer, Mary Ellen (I117)
 
118
Much information about Addie Davenport and Robert Thomas family appears in the application file for Robert Thomas's Civil War Pension, which Addie continued to draw after Robert's death.

These folks did not keep written records before 1865, so the application file contains many sworn statements of relatives regarding their recollection of births, marriages, deaths, and other events.

One of the most interesting of these statements relates to the death and burial of Sadie Wilkins ID 1462254, first wife of Robert Thomas. A relative swore that he was present when the deceased was buried--twice. He stated that grave robbers dug up her grave by mistake, and left the coffin above ground. He helped bury Sadie a second time, so he had first-hand knowledge of her death.

Roy Richard Thomas July 2006 
Davenport, Addie (I12912)
 
119
Much of the information in entries for the members of this line was based on "Family Roots of Daniel Michael Patterson, Descendants of Simon Jacob Diehl I":

http://rowanroots.gorowan.com/family_files/deal.html

"Generation No. 1


1. SIMON JACOB1 DIEHL I died Unknown.

Notes for SIMON JACOB DIEHL I:

Came to America on October 12, 1741 from the Palantinate area of Germany. The Diehls were chiefly settled at Frankfort, in the province of Brandenbrug, Germany. On September 9, 1738, William Diehl arrived at Philadelphia from Germany. William eventually moved on to North Carolina settling near Newton, then Lincoln County. He was soon followed by his brothers, John Peter Deal arrived on November 25, 1740 & Jacob Deal on October 12, 1741, both settling in Rowan County. Jacob fathered the linage that moved to Rowan Co., NC. Information from FTM Family History: Penn. Genealogies #1 CD #163 transcript of Huber Family Sailing vessel "Friendship" passenger list with them was Jacob Diehl. He was the son of Assistant judge Peter Diehl of Thaleischweiler.

German Church records indicate that 2 brothers, John Peter & Simon Jacob were Catechized by Rev. John Hecker in 1756 at the Doheck (Tohickon).


Child of SIMON JACOB DIEHL I is:

2. i. Jacob2 Deal II, b. 31 Oct 1762; d. 30 Apr 1855."

Edited by Roy Richard Thomas September 2008
 
Diehl, Simon Jacob (I20383)
 
120
NARS Civil War Soldiers & Sailors: "Amos Wright, Co. B., 53rd Ind Inf Regt, Pvt. in Pvt. out." 
Wright, Amos Hedge (I14870)
 
121
Ohio Deaths, 1908-1932, 1938-1944, and 1958-2002
Source Citation: Certificate: 23930; Volume: 15736
Source Information:
Ancestry.com and Ohio Department of Health. Ohio Deaths, 1908-1932, 1938-1944, and 1958-2002 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.
Original data:
Ohio. Division of Vital Statistics. Death Certificates and index, December 20, 1908-December 31, 1953. State Archives Series 3094. Ohio Historical Society, Ohio.
Ohio Department of Health. Index to Annual Deaths, 1958-2002. Ohio Department of Health, State Vital Statistics Unit, Columbus, OH, USA.

Name: George N Pifer
Birth Date: 1866
Gender: Male
Race: White
Residence City: Cleveland Heights
Residence County: Cuyahoga
Residence State: Ohio
Residence Country: United States
Death Date: 4 Apr 1959
City of Death: Cleveland
County of Death: Cuyahoga
Certificate: 23930
Age at Death: 93
Certifier: Physician
Autopsy: Yes, used for certification
Marital Status: Widowed
Census Tract: 0413
 
Pifer, George N. (I31844)
 
122
One example of showmanship in early carnivals:

http://www.archive.org/stream/newsecondhandban00unit/newsecondhandban00unit_djvu.txt

"SNAKE CHARMER. One banner 10 ft. wide and 10 ft. high. Lettered across the top: 'Mile De Lano, Snake Charmer.' This painting represents Miss De Lano on a stage, with plenty of rich colored snakes wound around her. The background represents a floral design, and at each side of the stage are red portieres, draped in rich colors. She is attired in dress knee length. It is a very rich appearing banner." 
Family F18043373
 
123
Polly Tomlinson, e-mail 24 Oct 2010:

"My research shows that she was born 7 December, 1873 in Winchester, Frederick, VA. She married William Sahm Tomlinson ca. 20 June, 1899, probably in or near Altoona, PA. She and William were involved in a group that started a Lutheran Church in Altoona, Blair Co., PA. After they married, he became a pastor and served in Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky before he stopped being a pastor, after only 7 years. During that time he lost three sons. They moved to Florida where he was killed while working on a construction job." 
Tomlinson, Reverend William Sahm (I29944)
 
124
Received from Jim Danielsen of Stoughton, WI:

"'Theodore M. Krumsieg [and] Catherine Louise Brandhorst'

Theodore Martin Christian Krumsieg was born on July 20, 1862 in St. Louis, Missouri. His parents were Rev. Theodore G. A. Krumsieg and Helene Grahn. He was christened on July 27, 1862 in Holy Cross Lutheran Church in St. Louis.

For an unknown reason, the census records of 1870 and 1880 indicate he was born in Wisconsin. But the 1900 and 1910 census records indicate he was born in Missouri.

His father graduated from the Concordia Seminary-Springfield, which was in St. Louis, Missouri during the Civil War, and was ordained in Fall Creek, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin on September 28, 1862. [This fact accounts for the assumption that Theodore was born in Eau Claire, WI rather than St. Louis, MO.]

As a child he moved with his family from parish to parish in Wisconsin and Minnesota. In 1881 at the age of 19 he moved to St. Paul, Minnesota and became a carpenter. He boarded at 440 (116) Rosebel. He married Catherine Marie Louisa Brandhorst in the winter of 1882/1883 and moved in with his in-laws. It appears as though he was taking an apprenticeship under his future father-in-law.

Catherine Marie Lousia Brandhorst was born on April 12, 1863 in St. Paul, Minnesota. She was the daughter of John Henry Brandhorst and Mary Ann Overmann. Her father was a successful carpenter who became a partner in a woodworking company. Her picture looks as though she was a pretty child with blond or light hair.

In 1884 they moved out of her parent?s home. Theodore became a part owner in a meat market and a cigar manufacturing company. On April 4, 1885 they had their first child, Helen Anna Krumsieg. This child was short lived and died a month later on May 4th. They lived in St. Paul until about 1886.

In about 1887 they moved to Duluth, Minnesota. Theodore worked as a bookkeeper and became an alderman. Their second child, Walter Theodore, was born on February 25, 1888. Alma Clara was born 10 months later on December 29, 1889. Adeline Louise Emilie was born 5 years later on March 7, 1895, and their last child, Arthur Victor, was born on May 18, 1898.

Louise died in Duluth on February 8, 1901 of uteri cancer at the age of 37. Elsie Brandhorst said her death was a very harsh one. A nurse attended her at home. The nurse finally quit and said she could no longer watch such suffering. Anna Brandhorst, Louise's sister, went to Duluth to care for her. Louise was buried in the Brandhorst family plot in the Oakwood Cemetery in St. Paul.

The 1900 census lists Anna Brandhorst as living with them. Apparently Louise had been sick for some time. All the members of the household could read, write and speak English, except for the small children. The house was owned without a mortgage.

Theodore married a woman named Emilie Aurelia Anna Augusta Adler of Red Wing, Minnesota on May 21, 1902. They were married at Trinity Lutheran Church, Rochester, Olmsted County, Minnesota. It is not known how they met as he lived in Duluth, and she was from near Red Wing in Olmstead County.

Emilie became the stepmother of the four children. Theodore and Emilie had a child named Clara on January 14, 1904. This child was short lived and died 3 days later. Later that year the entire family moved to Milwaukee, and Theodore became the Secretary/Treasurer of the Quinn Book and Stationery Company. He also became an alderman for the City of Milwaukee.

The 1910 census shows they were living in a rented flat on North 5th Street. All the members of the household could read, write and speak English. Theodore was a bookkeeper for a liquor company. The two older children were working and living at home. The family members probably spoke German around the home.

Adeline (Krumsieg) Danielsen often talked about being able to speak German, although her primary language was English when I knew her. She talked about the days when she was young and attended Lutheran grade school and Trinity Lutheran Church (Milwaukee). They were taught in German and church services were conducted in German.

Just prior to World War I, the State of Wisconsin passed the Bennett Law, which required English to be spoken in all schools, public or parochial. It was a shock to some of the older German-Americans Lutherans when English became the primary language in church services.

Emilie Adler died in 1913. Theodore married for the third time to Anna Stolper Haenal. I believe she was the widow of a Lutheran minister. Lois Danielsen talked about Anna with fond memories. Anna had enough money from her previous marriage to support herself and live independently. She could be called a liberated woman before her time. She was independent in a pleasant sense and self reliant. She owned an electric car and was able to drive; this was in a time when women didn't do those things. They would go for rides around Milwaukee in the car and have fun, just do girl things.

I remember meeting Anna Stolper Haenal Krumsieg as a very small child. At Christmas, Theodore's children and their children would meet at her home on north 2nd Street for a large Christmas dinner. I knew her by the name of 'Oma' and always believed that was her name. It wasn't until I was in my fifties that I learned that her name was Anna and 'Oma' was German for grandmother. As a small child I remember her as a short woman (noticeably shorter than my mother, who was about five feet four inches), who always wore a long ankle length black fancy dress at Christmas. My mother told me that all older women dressed that way, because that was the way women in the olden days dressed.

Theodore died on June 30, 1922 of pyemia abscess of the kidneys and lungs at St. Mary's Hospital in Milwaukee. His family said he had a burst appendix. He was buried in the Brandhorst family plot in St. Paul, Minnesota.

There is an eerie footnote to his death. He was the third person to be elected to the Treasurership of Concordia College-Milwaukee and to die in that office that year.

References: Concordia College - Milwaukee
Mathilda Brutlag, Milford, Illinois
Lois Danielsen
Kris Presba, Georgetown, California
Wisconsin State Historical Society"
 
Ida (I3504)
 
125
Received from Jim Danielsen of Stoughton, WI:

"'Theodore M. Krumsieg [and] Catherine Louise Brandhorst'

Theodore Martin Christian Krumsieg was born on July 20, 1862 in St. Louis, Missouri. His parents were Rev. Theodore G. A. Krumsieg and Helene Grahn. He was christened on July 27, 1862 in Holy Cross Lutheran Church in St. Louis.

For an unknown reason, the census records of 1870 and 1880 indicate he was born in Wisconsin. But the 1900 and 1910 census records indicate he was born in Missouri.

His father graduated from the Concordia Seminary-Springfield, which was in St. Louis, Missouri during the Civil War, and was ordained in Fall Creek, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin on September 28, 1862. [This fact accounts for the assumption that Theodore was born in Eau Claire, WI rather than St. Louis, MO.]

As a child he moved with his family from parish to parish in Wisconsin and Minnesota. In 1881 at the age of 19 he moved to St. Paul, Minnesota and became a carpenter. He boarded at 440 (116) Rosebel. He married Catherine Marie Louisa Brandhorst in the winter of 1882/1883 and moved in with his in-laws. It appears as though he was taking an apprenticeship under his future father-in-law.

Catherine Marie Lousia Brandhorst was born on April 12, 1863 in St. Paul, Minnesota. She was the daughter of John Henry Brandhorst and Mary Ann Overmann. Her father was a successful carpenter who became a partner in a woodworking company. Her picture looks as though she was a pretty child with blond or light hair.

In 1884 they moved out of her parent?s home. Theodore became a part owner in a meat market and a cigar manufacturing company. On April 4, 1885 they had their first child, Helen Anna Krumsieg. This child was short lived and died a month later on May 4th. They lived in St. Paul until about 1886.

In about 1887 they moved to Duluth, Minnesota. Theodore worked as a bookkeeper and became an alderman. Their second child, Walter Theodore, was born on February 25, 1888. Alma Clara was born 10 months later on December 29, 1889. Adeline Louise Emilie was born 5 years later on March 7, 1895, and their last child, Arthur Victor, was born on May 18, 1898.

Louise died in Duluth on February 8, 1901 of uteri cancer at the age of 37. Elsie Brandhorst said her death was a very harsh one. A nurse attended her at home. The nurse finally quit and said she could no longer watch such suffering. Anna Brandhorst, Louise's sister, went to Duluth to care for her. Louise was buried in the Brandhorst family plot in the Oakwood Cemetery in St. Paul.

The 1900 census lists Anna Brandhorst as living with them. Apparently Louise had been sick for some time. All the members of the household could read, write and speak English, except for the small children. The house was owned without a mortgage.

Theodore married a woman named Emilie Aurelia Anna Augusta Adler of Red Wing, Minnesota on May 21, 1902. They were married at Trinity Lutheran Church, Rochester, Olmsted County, Minnesota. It is not known how they met as he lived in Duluth, and she was from near Red Wing in Olmstead County.

Emilie became the stepmother of the four children. Theodore and Emilie had a child named Clara on January 14, 1904. This child was short lived and died 3 days later. Later that year the entire family moved to Milwaukee, and Theodore became the Secretary/Treasurer of the Quinn Book and Stationery Company. He also became an alderman for the City of Milwaukee.

The 1910 census shows they were living in a rented flat on North 5th Street. All the members of the household could read, write and speak English. Theodore was a bookkeeper for a liquor company. The two older children were working and living at home. The family members probably spoke German around the home.

Adeline (Krumsieg) Danielsen often talked about being able to speak German, although her primary language was English when I knew her. She talked about the days when she was young and attended Lutheran grade school and Trinity Lutheran Church (Milwaukee). They were taught in German and church services were conducted in German.

Just prior to World War I, the State of Wisconsin passed the Bennett Law, which required English to be spoken in all schools, public or parochial. It was a shock to some of the older German-Americans Lutherans when English became the primary language in church services.

Emilie Adler died in 1913. Theodore married for the third time to Anna Stolper Haenal. I believe she was the widow of a Lutheran minister. Lois Danielsen talked about Anna with fond memories. Anna had enough money from her previous marriage to support herself and live independently. She could be called a liberated woman before her time. She was independent in a pleasant sense and self reliant. She owned an electric car and was able to drive; this was in a time when women didn't do those things. They would go for rides around Milwaukee in the car and have fun, just do girl things.

I remember meeting Anna Stolper Haenal Krumsieg as a very small child. At Christmas, Theodore's children and their children would meet at her home on north 2nd Street for a large Christmas dinner. I knew her by the name of 'Oma' and always believed that was her name. It wasn't until I was in my fifties that I learned that her name was Anna and 'Oma' was German for grandmother. As a small child I remember her as a short woman (noticeably shorter than my mother, who was about five feet four inches), who always wore a long ankle length black fancy dress at Christmas. My mother told me that all older women dressed that way, because that was the way women in the olden days dressed.

Theodore died on June 30, 1922 of pyemia abscess of the kidneys and lungs at St. Mary's Hospital in Milwaukee. His family said he had a burst appendix. He was buried in the Brandhorst family plot in St. Paul, Minnesota.

There is an eerie footnote to his death. He was the third person to be elected to the Treasurership of Concordia College-Milwaukee and to die in that office that year.

References: Concordia College - Milwaukee
Mathilda Brutlag, Milford, Illinois
Lois Danielsen
Kris Presba, Georgetown, California
Wisconsin State Historical Society"
 
Krumsieg, Theodore Martin (I34146)
 

      «Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 346» Next»